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Ground Source Heat Pump Information

How do Ground Source Heat Pump systems work?

Ground source heat pumps circulate a mixture of antifreeze and and water around a loop of pipe which is buried in the garden. The fluid mixture absorbs heat from the ground which is then pumped through a heat exchanger. This low grade heat this then concentrated into a higher temperature which can then be used to heat water and provide central heating. As the fluid mixture cools, it is pumped back through the loop where it absorbs further energy.

The length of the loop depends on the size of the property and the amount of heat required. Properties with a larger garden will be capable of drawing more heat from the ground. Normally the loop is laid flat or in coiled threnches around two metres deep, although if the garden is too small, a vertical loop can be installed to a depth of around 100 metres.

Heat pumps deliver heat at constant low temperature unlike gas or oil boilers. This means that they may be required to run 24/7 in order to heat the property efficiently and radiators will not feel as warm as they would do when using a gas or oil boiler. Heat pumps have some impact on the environment as they need electricity to run but the extracted heat is renewable.

What are the benefits of Ground Source Heat Pumps?

Ground source heat pumps can reduce your carbon footprint as the emissions from the property can be lowered, although this amount differs depending which fuel is replaced. This also means that fuel bills will also be reduced. Once installed, the system requires little maintenance.

Are Ground Source Heat Pumps suitable for the building in question?

There are a number of considerations that need to made when choosing ground sources heat pumps for your property. Firstly, is the garden suitable for a ground loop. The garden doesn't actually have to be that large, but it must be suitable for excavating a trench and allowing machinery to operate. Secondly, as ground source heat pumps produce a lower temperature than gas or oil boilers therefore it is essential that the property is well insulated. If you are replacing an electric or coal heating system, a ground source heat pump will save you more on your heating bills. Heat pumps are not recommended for properties on the gas network. Finally, underfloor heating systems, low temperture fan convectors and large radiators will perform better than a standard radiator based systems. Installing the system during the construction phase of the development will greatly reduce installation costs.

 

Air Source Heat Pump Information

How do Air Source Heat Pump systems work?

An air source heat pump system work by absorbing heat energy from the air around the property. The system extracts heat from the outside air in a same way that a refrigerator extracts warm internal air. Air source heat pump systems are capable of extracting heat from the air even when the outside temperature is as low as minus 15o C.

Heat from the air is absorbed into a fluid which is pumped through a heat exchanger heat pump. This extracted low grade heat, is then concentrated into a higher temperature and can be used to heat the property and heat water.

Heat pumps deliver heat at constant low temperature unlike gas or oil boilers. This means that they may be required to run 24/7 in order to heat the property efficiently and radiators will not feel as warm as they would do when using a gas or oil boiler. Heat pumps have some impact on the environment as they need electricity to run but the extracted heat is renewable.

There are two main types of air source heat pump systems. Firstly, an air to air system produces warm air which is circulated by fans to heat your home. This types of system is unsuitable for providing hot water. Secondly, an air to water system distrubtes heat through a central heating system. As heat pumps are designed to be used for long periods of time at a low temperature, this would make them more suitable for large radiators or underfloor heating.

What are the benefits of Air Source Heat Pumps?

Air source heat pumps can reduce your carbon footprint as the emissions from the property can be lowered, although this amount differs depending which fuel is replaced. This also means that fuel bills will also be reduced. Once installed, the system requires little maintenance. Air source heat pumps are easier to install than the ground source heat pumps but they tend to be less efficient.

Are Ground Source Heat Pumps suitable for the building in question?

There are a number of considerations that need to made when choosing ground sources heat pumps for your property. Firstly, the location of the pump. The unit will need to be placed outside of the property, it can be fitted to a wall or on the ground although it will need a good air flow. A sunny location would be ideal.

Secondly, as air source heat pumps produce a lower temperature than gas or oil boilers therefore it is essential that the property is well insulated. If you are replacing an electric or coal heating system, an air source heat pump will save you more on your heating bills. Heat pumps are not recommended for properties on the gas network. Finally, underfloor heating systems and low temperture fan convectors  will perform better than a standard radiator based systems because of the level of heating required. Installing the system during the construction phase of the development will greatly reduce installation costs.

 
 



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